Year 6

Welcome to the Year 6 Home Learning page

Miss Stranks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6S - Miss Stranks

jstranks@whiptonbarton.org

 

Mr Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

6W - Mr Wilson

lwilson@whiptonbarton.org

 

Mr Kenchington

6K - Mr Kenchington

nkenchington@whiptonbarton.org

 

An English, maths and other curriculum task will be added daily, before 9am, during term time.

Please email the class teacher with any questions, queries or to share your learning. Teachers will be checking emails regularly and will reply between 9.00am and 3.00pm Monday - Friday.

 

Click below for a suggested daily timetable to help you plan your daily routine and also for a guide to 'We transfer' which will help you if you're having difficulty sending larger files such as videos.

Timetable

We transfer

 

Links to online learning platforms

https://www.activelearnprimary.co.uk/login?c=0 - Bug Club

https://readon.myon.co.uk/library/browse.html - Lots of books and children's news articles

https://ukhosted42.renlearn.co.uk/2236325/ - Accelerated Reader

https://login.mathletics.com/

https://ttrockstars.com/

https://www.purplemash.com/sch/whiptonbartonfed

https://www.devonmusicinteractive.org.uk/yumu

 

Tuesday 7th July

Good morning! We hope you are all well...did you solve yesterday's riddle?

The more of these you take, the more you leave behind. What are they?

Solution: Footsteps!

Here's another optical illusion - do you see 16 circles or 16 rectangles? They are both there - stick with it!

16Quick maths

English task

Today, you are going to build on the work from yesterday’s Authorfy session. Hopefully, you have managed to design a new biscuit and write a step-by-step guide on how to make it. With your biscuit prepared, you now ready for today’s task.

So, what we want you to do is come up with a brand name and some eye-catching packaging to help sell your biscuits. You need to ensure the packaging matches the style of your biscuit and contains the correct information on the outside (within reason, no need to go into nutritional values etc). Make sure customers want to grab your biscuits from the shelves, not someone else’s! Click here for some packaging options.

You also need to think of a slogan, something that every successful product has, click here for some slogan ideas.

Once you have both elements, you can display the slogan and packaging together in a simple poster to advertise your product.

Maths Task

We are going to spend a few lessons practising our arithmetic skills. Today, we are going to focus on addition and subtraction. There are three tasks to look at and choose from.

Task A is a range of addition and subtraction questions.

Task B focuses on subtraction and gets a little more complex.

Task C is some multi-step problems using both addition and subtraction.

Choose the tasks that challenge you. You might do one, two or all three! The answers are at the bottom so you can check your work - if you have made any mistakes, see if you can spot where you have gone wrong.

Other curriculum task - Water Safety

As the summer holidays draw even closer, and the weather starts to improve again (we hope!), many schools would usually have a visit from representatives of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI). The RNLI is a charity that provides a significant number of the lifeboat crews in the country, ensuring that people out and about in the water are kept safe. You may have seen one of their launch points towards the east end of Exmouth beach!

Today, we would like you to start by having a look at this picture of a day at the seaside. How many different hazards or risks can you spot?

After you’ve looked at that, have a go at this quiz, seeing if you can work out the right action to take in these emergency situations.   

 

Monday 6th July

Good morning! We hope you had a lovely weekend - can't believe there's only two weeks left! Don't forget to get your postcards to us if you haven't done so yet...

We are very close to finishing our book!

Here is chapter 16.

Cover

Here is the solution to Friday's spot the difference:

spot diff

Here's a riddle to start the week...

The more you take of these, the more you leave behind. What are they?

Quick maths

English Task

As it's Monday, we have another 'Authorfy' challenge for you!

Here is the information you need.

Looking for ward to seeing what you come up with!

Maths Task

Today, we are looking at factors and multiples.

Here is a video to get you started.

The tasks can then be found here. Choose Task A or B then have a look at the 'Extend' challenge.

Other curriculum task - History

As we discovered last week, by the late 600s, most of England had been settled by Anglo-Saxon tribes, which had split themselves into kingdoms. But before long, they found themselves not the only group wanting to settle in Britain…

From Scandinavia – areas like today’s Norway, Sweden and Denmark – the Vikings began coming across the sea in “longboats”. Click here for more information about these marauders!

But they weren’t just fighters: the Vikings were excellent sailors and built very capable ships. They also communicated using symbols called “runes”, many of which led to the letters we use to write to one another today!

Today, you have two options:

  • Design your own Viking longboat – if you look at the videos and pictures, you will notice that longboats were wide, quite flat boats. Vikings would line their shields along the sides of their longboat to protect them while sailing. They would have oars as well as a large sail, which might have included the tribe’s colours. They all had an animal’s head at the prow (that’s the very front of the boat). See if you can include all of these things on your own boat!
  • Explore the secrets of Viking runes – like you’ve done with hieroglyphs, see if you can write someone a secret message in runes. You can decide whether to give them a key for what the symbols mean, or just have them try and guess what it says!

 

Friday 3rd July

Good morning! Happy Friday! I can't believe we're at the end of another week - well done for all the fantastic learning you are still doing; we are really impressed with the effort from lots of you!

Did you solve the optical illusion!? There are actually no black dots! When you focus on each one individually you will see they are actually white...

As it's Friday, let's have another spot the difference:

Spot the difference

 

quick maths

You can check the solution here.

English task

Your reading task for today is based on a story called ‘the man who bought a mountain’. Read through the text and answer the questions that follow – example answers can be found at the end of each text so don’t scroll too far before you are complete. You should also note that there are 3 options: 1, 2 or 3 star difficulty (in that order) so before you begin you need to choose which text you think will be appropriate for you.

Click here to access the texts.

Maths Task

Today's lesson is all about patterns and sequences.

Here is a video to introduce the task.

Here is a reminder of what to do.

Other curriculum task - Art

Over the last few weeks, we’ve learned a little about certain shading techniques, including using different drawing media (that just means pens or pencils!) Shading gives different ways of indicating where light and dark areas are on the things you are drawing. Today, we’re going to look instead at drawing something quite specific: faces.

Watch this video, which describes how to draw some general guidelines for the proportions of the face. For example, you may never have noticed, but the space between a person’s eyes is usually the same width as one of their eyes!

You may need to pause the video quite often, or re-watch it a few times, as it moves quite quickly through the lines, but try to follow it and sketch a basic face using the suggested proportions.

Once you’ve done one face, you might want to practice a few others – or even observe a member of your family to see how their face is different from the guidelines!

Remember, no two faces are completely identical and these guidelines are just meant to help give you a starting point to work from.

 

Thursday 2nd July

Good morning!

Did you crack the Boggle challenge? The nine-letter word was 'developed'!

Here is chapter 15 of our book - only a few to go now! Let's hope these mysterious happenings get cleared up soon!

Cover

Here's another optical illusion - I find this one really frustrating!

How many black dots are there?

Illusion

 

quick maths

English task - Leavers' postcards

Hopefully you managed to create a draft version of your leavers’ postcard yesterday and you are ready to write up your final version. Make sure you have checked through your spelling and punctuation, and you have enough room to fit your writing in neatly. Also, it’d be lovely to see your very best drawing and colouring for the photo/picture side of the postcard – colouring pencils are best for this if you have some available.

Here's a quick reminder of what goes where:

Guidance

Here is an example of what yours could look like once finished (just colour needed).

Remember to get them back to us when you are finished and if you have any issues don’t hesitate to contact us at school.

Maths Task

Well done with a tricky challenge yesterday! Today, might be more familiar...

First, work through this video.

The task and stretch activity can then be found here.

Other curriculum task - Science

We have been thinking about how living things have adapted to their environments over time. All of these have been to do with helping the living thing survive – whether that is by helping it get food (like a kingfisher’s long beak for catching fish) or by stopping it from becoming food (like a hedgehog’s spines). You’ll remember that the animal with the adaptation that allows it to survive better than others is always the more likely to be able to reproduce, after which its offspring usually inherit the same characteristic.

Today, we would like you to invent your own creature and fill out a creature profile for it (it could look like this). You need to think about the following things:

  • Where does it live?
  • What does it eat?
  • How does it move?
  • Is it a predator or is it prey?
  • What kind of skin or other protection does it have?
  • How is it adapted to its environment?

You might want to start with the mash-up pet you created last week, but you could also create a whole new creature from scratch.

Don’t forget to draw a picture and then send us your completed creature profile!

 

Wednesday 1st July

Welcome to Wednesday! I can't believe it's July already - hopefully the sun will come back soon!

Did you manage to solve yesterday's riddle?

What is so fragile that saying its name breaks it?

Solution: Silence!

Here is another Boggle challenge to get your brains fired up!

Boggle

 

quick maths

English task - Leavers' postcards

Postcard image

Recently, you will have received an email informing you about the leaver’s postcards we would like you to create as a way of remembering and celebrating your time at Whipton Barton Federation. Today, we would like you to prepare these postcards so they are ready to be completed in ‘neat’ and returned to school by the end of the day on Thursday / Friday lunchtime at the latest.

Click here for some guidance on how to complete your postcard.

Maths Task

We are going to continue our learning recapping some of our work on algebra.

Here is today's video - make sure you have a pencil and paper to work through the examples. The video starts by going through the answers to yesterday's tasks. If you've already checked these, today's lesson starts at 4:50.

Today's tasks and extra challenge can then be found here.

Other curriculum task - French

Bonjour tout le monde! It’s been quite a while since we did any French, but don’t worry: Mr Kench hasn’t forgotten about you!

For starters, have a look at this video, in which Mr Kench introduces you to some of the members of his family…

Once you’ve watched it, see if you can draw and label your own “arbre généalogique” – family tree. You can decorate it however you’d like, but see how much detail you can include!

 

Tuesday 30th June

Morning!

Did you manage to find all 10 differences? It took us a while in school...!

solution

Here's a riddle for today...

What is so fragile that saying its name breaks it?

 

quick maths

Here is chapter 14 of our book...

Cover

English task

Today, you are going to take the ideas from yesterday’s Authorfy session and use them to create a new piece of writing. One of yesterday’s suggested options was writing a speech from the point of view of a household object – this is where the idea for today’s activity begins.

Your task is to write a speech from the point of view of an object in the classroom, or in the school building, which explains why you are the most important object in the whole school. Click here to see an example speech and some tips to help you on your way.

Once you have written your speech, why not film yourself reading it out loud and send your clips into us?

Maths Task

This week, we are going to recap some of the work we did earlier in the year on algebra. Today, we start by looking at function machines.

First, watch this video and work through the examples.

The task and stretch activity can then be found here.

Other curriculum task - 30 Days Wild

Today is the last day of 30 Days Wild – and a big well done to those of you who managed to do something “wild” as often as you could, particularly if you managed to do something every day!

But the enjoyment of wild things doesn’t end in June. The point of 30 Days Wild is to encourage everyone to spend more time thinking about what they can do to enjoy the wildlife that surrounds them every day – and what they can do to help protect it so that everyone can continue to enjoy it for years to come.

For today’s task, have a look at this Wildlife Trust website section, which suggests a whole range of relatively simple things that you can do to help wildlife at home.

Pick one thing that really interests you and think about how you might do it (you might need to get an adult involved in the conversation too)! If you’re lucky enough to have your own garden, that could be setting aside an area to encourage wildlife into, or even a home for a specific animal. If you don’t have a garden, there are plenty of things you can still do to encourage wildlife, from providing food, shelter and water for birds, to conserving water and using less plastic!

Let’s see if we can take some of the interesting and important things we’ve learned during 30 Days Wild and apply them to the rest of our year!

 

Monday 29th June

Welcome to another week of home learning! I can't believe another month has nearly gone! It's been great to see everything you've been up to so do keep sending it in - you're doing a fab job!

Here's another spot the difference to start our week...

spot diff

 

quick maths

English Task

Today is the second of our English challenges for everyone in year 1 to year 6! Don't forget to send us what you create. This week is all about imagining an object in your home come to life!

Here is the task.

Once you have seen the video, here are a few ideas for how you could complete the challenge:

  • a diary from the object's point of view
  • a cartoon showing it's thoughts as different things happen to it
  • a speech (you could even video it!)
  • a letter from it to you (a bit like 'The day the crayons quit')
  • or another idea of your own!

Maths Task

Today, we have an investigation for you...!

This should give you a chance to practise your 'trial and improvement' skills - you probably won't get the answer first time! Even if you do complete it quickly, can you find a better solution!?

four digit targets2

If you want to print the task, you can find it here.

Other curriculum task - History/Geography

Over the last two weeks, we have learnt a lot about the Anglo-Saxons, who came across the sea from the areas now known as Denmark, northern Germany and the Netherlands to settle in Britain. By around AD600, they had settled in most places in England, separating it up into kingdoms. To find out how Anglo-Saxon Britain was ruled, click here.

Many of the names of these kingdoms are still used for the same areas today (although they’re now counties, not kingdoms), including Northumbria, East Anglia, Kent, Sussex and Essex! Wessex, on the other hand, is no longer talked about but it included most of the South of England, including today’s Somerset and parts of Devon.

Your task is to label this map of the seven kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon Britain. See if you can use Google Maps to help you find some of the places (not all of them are still used - but you'll have to work that out on your own)!

If you’re struggling to know where to start, this map may make it a little bit easier.

For an extra challenge, see how many of these places you can also mark on the map (some of them are cities, others are countries):

  • Exeter
  • London
  • Bristol
  • Birmingham
  • Manchester
  • Newcastle
  • Scotland
  • Wales

 

Friday 26th June

Hello! Our theme for this Friday is 'It's good to be me!' Why not send us a photo of you with something which is special to you or of you performing a special skill!?

We hope you liked yesterday's optical illusion - did you spot the duck AND the rabbit!?

Here's a 'Where's Wally?' to end the week...

where's wally

 

quick maths

English task

Your reading task today couldn’t be more appropriate or well matched to current affairs if we tried. Members of the National Health Service (NHS) have been real-life superheroes over the past few months and this incredible service is the focus of your work today.

Read through the text and answer the questions that follow – example answers can be found at the end of each text so don’t scroll too far before you are complete. You should also note that there are 3 options: 1, 2 or 3 star difficulty (in that order) so before you begin you need to choose which text you think will be appropriate for you.

Click here to access the texts.

Maths Task

To finish our work on decimals, percentages and fractions, you have been set a couple of tasks on mathletics which allow you to practise these skills. Once these are complete, you can choose some of the other activities or see how much you can score on live mathletics!

Other curriculum task - History

Earlier this week, we set a few different Anglo-Saxon-themed tasks - but there were lots of different things to try and get your heads around. Today, we'd like you to pick one of the tasks that you didn't do on Tuesday, and finish the week with some art, a game or a story!

Here's a reminder of the options:

  • Storytelling: listen to the tale of Beowulf, as told by Beardy the Bard. When you have watched it, make a storyboard with a simple picture and a caption for each of the main parts of the story. If you want to take this to another level, maybe you could think about trying to film yourself acting out the story to go alongside the Bard's narration!
  • Art and Design: look at the pictures on this webpage of some of the Saxon artefacts discovered in the ancient burial chamber of Sutton Hoo. You may notice that a lot of them use symmetry in their decoration. Design your own piece of Saxon treasure and write a short paragraph explaining what you have created: is it a belt buckle? Or the hilt of a sword? Or perhaps a brooch to hold a cloak in place? Or a warrior’s helmet?
  • Games: the Saxons used the things around them, including sticks stones and bits of bone, to design games that they could play to pass the time. A number of games are described here. See if you can collect enough little stones to create a game of Tabula or Draughts, or maybe teach yourself to become a Knucklebones champion!

 

Thursday 25th June

Good morning! How are you all today? We hope you enjoyed the sunshine yesterday - let's hope it hangs around for the weekend!

Did you spot the problem with the elephant yesterday!? It appeared to have 5 legs!

Here's another:

Illusion

Here is the next installment of our book.

Chapter 13

Cover

quick maths

English task

Today’s English task is going to be all about presenting the interview notes you have made so far.

Option 1:

Type your interview questions and answers up and present them with some accompanying photos of the interview in progress. You could try to dress up in character by experimenting with some different outfits to make it look authentic.

Option 2:

(This option requires help from someone at home)

Film the interview between journalist and Lighthouse keeper. First, you need to ask someone at home to kindly play the role of the journalist and read out the questions for you to answer. This means of course that you will take the role of Lighthouse keeper and therefore you’ll need to rehearse your answers before filming. Try to think about how he seemed during the video clip and how you think he might sound when responding to certain questions – will he be relieved, annoyed or even quite cross? These things will help you when you play the role. As with the photos in option 1, you might like to dress up for the role if you can but don’t let it stop you if you can’t.

Option 3:

Create a cartoon strip showing the interview between the journalist and the Lighthouse keeper. This option gives you the chance to be creative with illustration and could bring your interview to life in a different way. Think carefully about where the interview might take place (possibly in the lighthouse or even in the pub?) Have a look at these example cartoon strip templates for layout ideas. Remember to leave space to add in the text part of the interview as well as the illustrations.

Choose one of these options and please send us your fabulous efforts!

Maths Task

Today, we don't have a new video to watch. Instead, we have put together a few activities which recap a few of the things you have done over the last couple of weeks. Work through as many as you are able to. They are all things which have been covered in the videos and tasks recently.

Task A

Task B

Task C

Other curriculum task - 30 Days Wild/RE

A ‘Mandala’ is a circular, geometric, usually symmetrical configuration of symbols, which plays a part in many different religions as a way of helping people focus their attention and centre themselves.

The word itself comes from Sanskrit, and means “circle”, and it can remind us of the way that things are connected to one another. Things in nature, in particular, do not really have a clear beginning or end but are part of a continuing pattern or connected cycle of existence. In the words of the Lion King: “It’s the Circle of Life!”

Today, we want you to have a go at making your own Mandala, out of things you find in the natural world around you. You will want to try and find a few of the same thing – or things that look as similar as possible – as Mandalas include symmetry, whether linear (across a line) or rotational (around a point).

Don’t stick your things down, as you will want to return them to nature when you’ve finished, but place them on a flat surface. Pick one element as your central point and then build a pattern out from there.

And don’t forget to send us a picture of your beautiful creations before you return them to wherever they came from!

 

Wednesday 24th June

Welcome to Wednesday!

How did you get on with yesterday's riddle?

We had a couple of solutions that made sense...

What is always in front of you but can never be seen?

Either, 'The future' or 'Your nose'!

Here's something a little different to get us started today - this is an optical illusion:

Can you spot what is wrong with the elephant?!

optical illusion

 

quick maths

English task

So, yesterday you worked on writing interview questions from the point of view of a journalist, and responses from the Lighthouse keeper. Today, we would like you to continue your investigation into the events that took place at the lighthouse by interviewing one of the villagers to get their side of the story.

You should assume the villager was present in the pub at the beginning of the story and was also there to help out at the end. You can decide upon the personality of the villager and this will determine how they respond to the questions you ask them. Could they be a friend of the Lighthouse keeper? Maybe it was their birthday celebration or maybe they just a helpful member of the public… you choose.

Remember to use open-ended questions and follow up questions to get facts and emotional responses from the person being interviewed. Click here for another reminder of the question types and their uses.

Maths Task

We are really impressed with how you have been pushing your thinking about fractions over the last week. Today, we are recapping finding fractions of amounts.

Take a look at this video first.

The tasks can then be found here.

Other curriculum task - Music

Today you are going to have a bit of an explore with a new Purple Mash programme called “Busy Beats”. Like with 2Sequence, it allows you to create musical patterns, involving a range of different percussive and melodic sounds, set off by a “rippler”.

This task is not about just trying to fill the space with as many different sounds and noises as possible, but about thinking how ripplers affect one another and about how the careful placement of a particular sound can change the rhythm of a piece.

Mr Kenchington has given a demonstration of some of his exploration with Busy Beats here.

As ever, make sure you hand in your work at the end to let us see what you've created!

 

Tuesday 23rd June

Good Morning! How did you get on with your 'mash-up' pets yesterday! We have seen a few but would love to see more!

Here is the solution to yesterday's spot the difference:

spot diff solution

It's Tuesday so time for another riddle:

What is always in front of you but can't be seen?

Here is Chapter 12 of 'The Longest Night of Charlie Noon'

Cover

 

 

 

 

 

Quick maths

 

English task

Time to explore ‘the Lighthouse’ again today, but this time through the use of interview. It is going to be your job to take on the roles of both journalist and Lighthouse keeper and come up with a set of questions and responses. You will focus your interview on the events shown in the video clip and try to get information and reaction from the lighthouse keeper himself.

So, what do you need to consider when creating interview questions? Click here for some hints, tips and examples.

Now that you have seen some example questions and considered the purpose of your interview, we would like you to create a set of questions to ask the Lighthouse keeper (perhaps give him a name). You will also need to think about what his responses will be in advance as they may lead you into follow up questions – you want to be prepared! The amount of questions and answers you decide upon is up to you but you should think about 5 as a minimum in order to be thorough.

If you are feeling brave then why not put yourself in the hot seat and act out the interview with somebody at home? Take it turns being the two different people and see how you do. You might like to keep the questions the same but improvise the responses on the spot to make it interesting (perhaps record it and see who makes the most convincing Lighthouse keeper).

Maths task

We are really impressed with how you are doing with fractions. Today, we are continuing to think about improper fractions and mixed numbers.

First, watch this video and work through the examples.

The task and extension can then be found here.

Other curriculum task - History

Today we are going to carry on looking at some elements of life in Anglo-Saxon Britain, specifically to do with what people did to pass the time, particularly on long, cold wintry nights. If you need a reminder of who the Anglo-Saxons were, watch the video at the top of this webpage.

Start by reading the information and looking at some of the pictures on the rest of the webpage, which talks about some of the things they made and constructed, as well as about the stories they told and the games they played.

Now, pick from the tasks below:

  • Storytelling: listen to the Tale of Beowulf, as told by Beardy the Bard. When you have watched it, make a storyboard with a simple picture and a caption for each of the main parts of the story.
  • Art and Design: look at the pictures on this webpage of some of the Saxon artefacts discovered in the ancient burial chamber of Sutton Hoo. You may notice that a lot of them use symmetry in their decoration. Design your own piece of Saxon treasure and write a short paragraph explaining what you have created: is it a belt buckle? Or the hilt of a sword? Or perhaps a brooch to hold a cloak in place? Or a warrior’s helmet?
  • Games: the Saxons used the things around them, including sticks stones and bits of bone, to design games that they could play to pass the time. A number of games are described here. See if you can collect enough little stones to create a game of Tabula or Draughts, or maybe teach yourself to become a Knucklebones champion!

 

Monday 22nd June

Hello! Welcome to another week! We hope you managed to enjoy some sunshine at the weekend without getting caught in the showers...

Here is another spot the difference to start our week - you are doing very well with them!

spot diffQuick maths

English Task

Today's task is a little different...

Everyone in Year 1 to Year 6 is going to be trying the same task!

All the details can be found in this document. If you have brothers and sisters, why not try this together!?

We'd love to see what you come up with!

Maths Task

This week, we are continuing to deepen our understanding of, and confidence using, fractions.

Watch this video which introduces the lesson.

Task A

Task B

Other curriculum task - Science

We are continuing to have a think about inheritance, but specifically as it relates to adaptation.

To get your brain working to start with, have a go at this game looking for the triangular “moths” camouflaged against their background.

But have you ever wondered how moths became camouflaged in the first place? Do they just pick their home because of the way they look? Not quite!

Moths and trees

 

For example, let's look at the peppered moth. All peppered moths were originally light coloured, but this changed over time:

  • A random genetic mutation takes place when offspring are born, causing them to be different from their parent in some capacity – like a new moth developing darker wings
  • Because of this difference, one group of creatures gains an advantage in their setting – a moth with darker wings might be better camouflaged than the others
  • This advantage leads this group to survive better than other groups – a moth that is better camouflaged is less likely to be eaten
  • When the surviving creature has its own offspring, the genetic mutation is inherited – dark-winged moths create more dark-winged moths!

So what about these creatures: what traits do you think their ancestors adapted to help them survive in their environment and how do they help them?

 

Friday 19th June

back to front

 

Did you manage to solve yesterday's riddle:

David's parents have three sons: Snap, Crackle and...?

Solution: David! 

quick maths

 

English Task

This week's reading task is all about extinct and endangered animals. The text and questions are in separate documents this week:

Text 

Questions

Maths Task

As today is Back to Front Friday, we thought we'd suggest that you have an explore on the theme of lines of symmetry. Symmetry causes things to appear on one side like a mirror-image (a back-to-front version) of whatever is on the other side of them.

This tool will allow you to paint different pictures, using a range of tools, with either one line of symmetry (horizontal or vertical) or two!

See what different things you can create! For an extra challenge, can you make:

  • A Christmas tree, decorated with tinsel and a star at the top?
  • A Hawaiian pizza, complete with ham and pineapple bits?
  • A beautiful butterfly, showing of its summer colours?

Make sure you send us a photo of your finished product!

Other curriculum task - Geography

energy image

 

It’s time to learn about fossil fuels (booo!) and renewable energy (yaaay!) In today’s lesson you will get to watch two video clips which explore these forms of energy and the pros and cons of both. To begin with, click here to access the BBC bitesize website and watch both video clips - it would also be useful to read the additional information that accompanies the clips.

Now you are ready to have a go at today’s activities:

Activity 1 – Take the quiz to test your knowledge of fossil fuels and renewable energy.

Activity 2- Complete this word search and why not practise the spelling of this new vocabulary at the same time. The answers are on the same document so you can mark when you’re done.

Activity 3 – (This activity is optional as you have already completed some comprehension in English) Have a go at this comprehension task; read the text and choose from the multiple choice answers.

 

Thursday 18th June 

Hello! I can't believe it's Thursday again already! If you haven't sent anything in to us so far this week, it would be great to see what you have been up to!

Don't forget tomorrow is our next theme day - what could you do 'back-to-front'!?

Here's another riddle to get your brains thinking...

David's parents have three sons: Snap, Crackle and ...?

Here is chapter 11 of 'The longest night of Charlie Noon'.

Charlie Noon

quick maths

English Task

Today we are going to be using the sentences we created yesterday to write some diary entries for the lighthouse keeper. If you have a lot of boxes with lots of sentences, don't worry about doing all of them...! You could just choose 2 or 3 boxes to turn into paragraphs. If you want to do more, feel free!

Watch this video which demonstrates how you can turn your ideas into paragraphs.

Here is the link to the animation if it would be useful to see again.

Maths task

Today we are thinking about how our understanding of fractions of shapes can help us visualise fractions on a line, which brings us full circle to the relationship between fractions and decimals that we looked at last week.

Have a look at this video from Mr Kenchington, then have a go at this task. If you finish that and want to extend your thinking, have a look at this stretch.

Other curriculum task - Computing

Today, we would like you to have another go at the 2logo task some of you attempted last week. This time you should try to think of a theme for your background map before you start and I would definitely choose something you will have fun creating (a Minecraft style, maybe even the home of one of your favourite fictional characters). You don’t have to choose a standard theme as I did in the tutorial video; be creative!

If you didn’t see the tutorial last week then you can see it again here.

Wednesday 17th June

Good morning!

Here is the solution to yesterday's spot the difference - I found this a tricky one; how many differences did you find?

solution

 

Here is another Boggle challenge to start the day! Can you find the 9 letter word!?

Boggle

 

quick maths

 

English Task

Today, we are going to start writing some sentences to use in our 'lighthouse keeper's diary'. We will use the symbols we chose yesterday to focus our ideas.

Here is a video which shows you how to get started.

You may want to watch the animation again to help you create your sentences.

Maths Task

Today we are going to extend our thinking to look at fractions of shapes, carefully thinking about how many equal parts the whole has been split into.

Start by watching this video.

When you've finished the video, ask yourself how confident you feel about fractions of shapes. If you feel less confident and still want to work on some of the sorts of things you've seen in the video, complete Task A. If you feel confident that you understand how they work, complete Task B.

Or, if you are feeling particularly inspired, have a go at both tasks!

Other curriculum task - 30 Days Wild

We are really excited about today’s activity and think the finished pieces could be extremely effective.  What we would like you to do is create a nature art frame…that literally frames nature to create a piece of art. Click here to have a look at some examples and how to make you own.

You don’t need to limit yourself to butterflies and hearts, feel free to be creative – the more variety, the better.

Please, please, please send us some photos of your frames in action in different places – we’d love to make a display of them at school and then post a picture for you all to see!

 

Tuesday 16th June

Hello! Hope you are all well and enjoyed getting stuck in to some new topics yesterday...

How did you get on with the riddle?

Here's a reminder:

What is easy to get into, but difficult to get out of?

Solution: Trouble!

Let's start today with another spot the difference! Can you find all 10 differences!?

spot diff

 

quick maths

 

Here is chapter 10 of our book!

Charlie Noon

 

English Task

stills

Today, we are going to carry on thinking about the new animation we watched yesterday.

Here is the link again as you will need to watch it again for today's task.

Watch this video which introduces today's lesson.

Here is a reminder of the task if you need it.

 

Maths Task

Today we are going to continue to think about what fractions actually are at their most basic level, looking carefully at "parts" and "wholes".

Start by watching this video.

When you've finished the video, have a go at today's task and extend your thinking with this stretch about estimating fractions.

 

Other curriculum task - History

Today, you going to be learning about the Anglo-Saxons; where they came from, what they did and how they lived. Click here to access the website that will provide today’s information and activities.

  • To begin with, read the information provided and view the first video clip, both of which explain who the Anglo-Saxons were.
  •  Next, scroll down below the clip and look at the information about growing up in a Saxon village - explore the interactive village scene to learn about village life in greater detail (remember to click on the question mark to ensure you don’t miss any of the interactive features).
  • After exploring the village and reading the information that follows, scroll down to the video clip entitled ‘Activity 2’ - a tour of an Anglo-Saxon village and watch it.

Your task today is to use the information you have been given to make notes on the different roles and jobs people carried out within a typical Saxon village. Consider why they were so important and talk briefly about any similarities or differences you can spot compared to modern day life in the U.K.

If you feel up for an extra challenge and love being creative, why not have a go at making your own model Saxon village? Click here to see what it could look like.

 

Monday 15th June

Good Morning! We hope you had a lovely weekend and are ready to get going on another week of home learning! We still love to see what you have been doing so make sure you send it in... you can still email us if you have any questions too - we will get back to you as soon as we can!

Here's another riddle to start our week:

What is easy to get into, but difficult to get out of?

quick maths

English Task

Lighthouse

We are starting something new this week in English.

First, watch this short animation - you may want to watch a couple of times.

Now watch this video, which introduces today's task.

The task can be found here - remember, you may find it easier to keep replaying parts of the animation rather than just using the still images.

 

Maths task

This morning, we are going to be thinking about what fractions are at their most basic level and how we use them every day.

Watch this video to start with.

Today's tasks can be found here. They also include a stretch activity, for if you make your way through the tasks quickly and want to extend your thinking.

 

Other curriculum task - Art

Today, we would like you to use the techniques (shading and working with shadow and light) you have looked at over past two sessions to create a new piece of art. There are going to be a few differences this time because we actually want you to use pen… yes you heard it correct, you are going to use pen to draw and sketch!

Before I explain the task, have a look at this video from Mary Doodles which recaps the skills from the previous two art sessions but also shows how to work with pen. Pause and re-watch where required.

So, today’s task is in two parts: first, take any object from your house and sketch it using the shading techniques mentioned previously – take your time and aim to create a sketch that is as close to the real thing as you can. Second, you will zoom in and focus on one part of the sketch and enlarge into a new sketch of its own – have a look at this example to give you an idea of how it could look.

Note: If you find it too tricky with a pen then just use a pencil.

As always, send us your examples and get those sparks of creativity flying.

Friday 12th June

Welcome to crazy hair day! Remember to send us your photos - we can't wait to see all of your creations!

hair

 

Time to find out what has happened to Charlie, Dizzy and Johnny in the next chapter of our book!

Charlie Noon

quick maths

 

English Task

Today we have another reading task for you. This piece imagines that, at some stage in our future, global warming and rising tides get to such a point that some humans have had to evacuate Earth, and the first child born in space writes about their opportunity for a second chance...

Read the text and answer the questions. Remember to use the text to support your answers!

Second Chance

 

Maths Task

Something a little different today.

Click this link to take you to a range of challenges. There are 10 challenges which get harder and harder. Work through as many as you can! If you get stuck on a particular one, there are hints and tips below. Challenges 8-10 are really aimed at secondary schools - feel free to give them a go if you like but don't worry of not!

Hints and tips (only use them if you need to):

Challenge 2

Challenge 3

Challenge 4

Challenge 5

Challenge 6

Challenge 7

If you want to try 8 or 9 and would like a tip, email in and we can help you out!

Other curriculum task - Computing

Today, we have a new activity for you to have a go at on 2Logo. Click here to watch an explanation of the task. Remember, creativity is the key word today so get your thinking caps on and go crazy!

Thursday 11th June

Good morning! We hope you are all ready for crazy hair day tomorrow! We are looking forward to seeing some pictures!

Important reminder: If you are going to St Luke's next year, you should have had a form to fill in that they emailed to your parents or carers. If you haven't sent it back to them yet, they have asked us to remind you that this must be done by Sunday... thanks!

How did you get on with yesterday's riddle?

What happens once in a lifetime, twice in a moment but never in a hundred years?

Solution: The letter 'm'!

We have another Boggle challenge today:

Boggle

 

Quick maths

English Task

Today, your task is clear: write your acrostic poem!

Use everything you’ve already worked on over the last couple of weeks:

  • Look back at some of the other Lost Words poems (we’ve explored Ivy, Fern and Kingfisher in particular) and think about how they might inspire your writing style.
  • Keep in mind the many facts that you have learned about your subject: how it looks, how it moves, what it eats, where it lives etc.
  • Don’t forget to include the techniques that move your poem into being something more “Year 6”. Remember that things like repeated sounds, sentences that run over lines, interesting vocabulary and kennings provide pulse, rhythm and melody that make your poetry sound like music.

When you’re happy that the writing is the best it can be, feel free to write it up in a neat, presentation format and decorate it!

We very much look forward to seeing what you come up with.

 

Maths Task

Here is the next video, continuing to look at the links between fractions, decimals and percentages.

The tasks and stretch activity can be found here.

 

Other curriculum task - 30 Days Wild

Today, we would like you to make a random act of recycling. With the amount of single use items in our everyday lives nowadays: plastic straws, bottles, packaging etc it is our responsibility to do our bit to help reduce unnecessary waste as much as we can.

With this in mind, your challenge is to take a piece of recyclable ‘rubbish’ and turn it into something new – this could be a practical thing such as turning a used yoghurt pot into a pot to grow seeds, or something fun such as taking a cardboard cereal box and turning it into a wacky collage. You really can use anything you have available in your household, however you must ask a responsible adult before raiding the cupboard or garage!

Click here to have a look at some possible ideas to get you started.

 

Wednesday 10th June 2020

Morning!

Don't forget that Friday is our 'crazy hair' day at home and at school... what have you got planned!?

Before we crack on, here is the solution to the 'spot the difference'... How did you get on!?

solution

Here's another riddle to get your brains warmed up!

What happens once in a lifetime, twice in a moment but never in a hundred years?

Here is the next chapter of our book - hope you are enjoying it!

Charlie Noon

Quick maths

 

English Task

Today, you are going to use the information you found out yesterday and apply some of the “Year 6” techniques we talked about on Monday:

  • Interesting vocabulary
  • Kennings
  • Alliteration, assonance and repeated word or sentence structures
  • Rhyming

For a start, see how many adjectives you can come up with to describe your subject. Think about its colours, its movements and any distinctive features.

Now, think of five of key verbs (actions) related to your subject. Use a thesaurus to explore some alternatives for each one.

For example, eagles are well-known for flying. Instead of flying, I might choose: hovering, soaringwheeling, gliding or windborne

After you’ve explored some more interesting vocabulary, see if you can write some kennings about your subject. Remember that a kenning describes (or gives a new name to) a creature based on what it does:

  • An eagle might be a “sky soarer”
  • A beaver might be a “trunk gnawer”
  • A sunflower might be a “sun seeker”

For something extra special, look for groups of words that create alliteration (repeated consonant sounds) or assonance (repeated vowel sounds).

Keep all of your ideas safe, as these will form the basis of your acrostic poem!

 

Maths Task

We are continuing our work on decimals and fractions today as well as linking in percentages.

Here is the video which introduces the lesson. The audio is a little quiet so you may need to turn it up or use headphones!

The tasks and stretch activity can be found here.

 

Other curriculum task - Science

Today, we would like you to continue with the work you have previously done on inheritance. First, have a look at the following statements, decide if you think they are true or false and give your reasons (you might want to think back to the last inheritance lesson for some hints).

If a woman shaves her eyebrows off, her baby would be likely to have no eyebrows either.

If a man was allergic to peanuts, his child would also definitely have a peanut allergy.

Once you have given your answers, have a look at this video clip to find out a little bit more about how inheritance actually works – you might want to make a few notes about some of the facts you hear. Re-watch the clip a couple of times if you miss anything.

Your task today is to organise a number of inherited and environmental features into the correct sections of a Venn diagram.

Remember, inherited features come from your parents and extended family; environmental features can be influenced by things around you.

Click here to access the activity and feel free to send us some of your examples.

 

Tuesday 9th June 2020

Hello! Happy Tuesday! It's been lovely to see how you are getting on at home - do send in some photos if we haven't heard from you yet!

How did you get on with the riddle? It was... a  map!

Here's another spot the difference to get us started:

spot diff

 

quick maths

 

English task

By the end of this week, you will have written your own acrostic poem, inspired by the book of Lost Words. In order to do that, you will need to make sure you know as much as you can about the subject of your poem.

Today, your task will therefore be to pick one of these three living things to research so that you can eventually write a poem about it: an eagle, a beaver or a sunflower.

You might want to start by watching one of these videos to find out more about your subject:

You can also find other videos elsewhere, or use an encyclopaedia (physical or online) to find out as much information as you can.

Think about how detailed the poems are in The Lost Words. To help you write a good poem, you will want to be able to answer questions like:

  • What does it look like?
  • What does it do?
  • How does it move?
  • What does it eat?
  • Where does it live?

The more information you have to work with, the more options you’ll have for things to focus on in the poem you eventually write! Make sure you keep all your thoughts from today safe for later this week.

If you would prefer to pick a different living thing – plant or animal – then you can, but remember to find a range of sources of information and see what videos you can find about them, to help you see what they are like, how they move and what makes them distinctive.

 

Maths task

Here is today's video which introduces our lesson.

When you have watched it, the different tasks can be found here.

 

Other curriculum task - Art

During last week’s art session, you learned about different shading techniques and created a value scale to represent light and dark shades – click here if you would like a reminder. Today, we want you to take these skills and apply them to some still life sketching (drawing an object or group of objects).

Before you get started, you need to watch this video clip where Mary Doodles will explain about light and shadow and you can see where you can use those techniques of basic shading, hatching, cross-hatching, stippling and smudging. Mary recommends sketching an egg but you can use any household object and follow her simple steps to create your own piece of art.

We look forward to seeing what you come up with; be creative, be daring and please send your examples to us as we love to see your fabulous efforts!

 

Monday 8th June 2020

Good Morning! We hope you had a lovely weekend and are ready for another week of home learning!

We haven't had a riddle in a while, so here is one to try!

Where can you find cities, towns, shops and streets but no people?

We'll post the answer tomorrow...

How did you get on with the Boggle challenge on Friday? The longest possible word was 'affection'.

quick maths

 

English task

This morning we are going to be having a careful think about the techniques that make our poems move from the simple pieces we might have written when we first learned about acrostics in Year 3, into something that looks and sounds a bit more “Year 6”!

Making really good poetry is not just about using longer, more complicated or “more interesting” words – though this can sometimes help! Rather, we need to think about the way the words sound, the way they feel as you say them and the picture they create in your mind.

Poetry is like music: it is made to be performed, or at least spoken out loud. It can have pulse, rhythm, melody and all the things we talk about in our music lessons.

Firstly, have a look at these two acrostic poems. One of them is a good “Year 3” poem, the other a good “Year 6” level, both about the same topic. Which one do you think is which?

Autumn acrostics

Note down some of your thoughts about what is particularly good about both of them.

In a separate list, note down some of your thoughts about what could be improved in either poem.

Now have a look at this document, where Mr Kenchington has annotated the different things that he thinks make the Year 6 poem stand out.

In the same way, take the Kingfisher poem that we looked at last Thursday and pull out the things in it that make it stand out. This might include:

  • Interesting vocabulary
  • Sentences that run across lines
  • Kennings
  • Alliteration, assonance and repeated word or sentence structures
  • Rhyming (within lines or at the end of them)

 

Maths task

For today's lesson, look at this video. Make sure you have a pen and paper as you'll be asked to pause the video and try things out at different points.

Once you have worked through the video, the main activity and stretch activity can be found here.

 

Other curriculum task

Today, you are going to have a look at recycling, sustainability and how we can deal with different types of plastics. Let’s start by watching the first video clip from BBC Bitesize where Sue Venir will talk to you about single-use plastics and the issues caused by our reliance on plastic. You then need to read the information that follows before watching the second video clip about sustainability – just scroll down the BBC Bitesize webpage to find it.

Now that you have looked at the different sources of information, there are 3 activities to have a go at:

Activity 1 – A quiz to test your knowledge of sustainability and plastics.

Activity 2 – Look at the different objects and sort them into the correct categories (if you can’t print the document out then write lists with subheadings instead). Click here to see the document.

Activity 3 - This final activity offers a selection of mini tasks for you to have a go at; complete them all or just choose a few. Click here to see the document.

Friday 5th June 2020

Happy Friday!

Don't forget that today is the first of our "Friday Theme Days", to try and keep our home and school learners united during this strange time. Wherever you are learning today, this is your opportunity to Get Creative!

We've heard of someone planning a stop-motion film, and someone else planning a musical composition just using spoons! Whether it's art, music, drama, or something else, you all have the capacity to create something amazing. We can't wait to see what you come up with! Make sure you send us plenty of photos...

 

Also, the NSPCC, who regularly come in to school to take assemblies are streaming a session live on their facebook page this morning at 9:30. 

Here is some information from them if you're interested:

Over the years, our Speak out Stay safe assemblies have taken place in more than 90% of all primary schools across the UK, giving children the knowledge they need to stay safe from harm and to speak out if they're worried.

While we aren't able to run our assemblies as normal right now, we are SO excited to announce that on Friday June 5th we'll be hosting our very own VIRTUAL Speak out Stay safe assembly alongside some VERY special guests... Drumroll please... 

⭐️ Ant and Dec
⭐️ David Walliams
⭐️ Children and Families Minister Vicky Ford MP!

Tune in on their facebook page!

In the meantime, here is the solution to yesterday's spot the difference:

solution

 

And here is something a little different to start with today:

Boggle

 

English Task

We have another reading task for you today.

Read this text and answer the questions. Remember to use the text to support your answers.

text

 

Maths task

Your maths task today is the quick-fire game of ‘Hit the button’. We have played this in school before and you had a go for home learning at the beginning of May. We would like you to spend 20-30 minutes playing on the different modes there are within the game: number bonds, doubles, halves, times tables, division facts and square numbers. Within each game mode, there are a number of different options available to adjust the difficulty – perfect for setting the right amount of challenge for your ability. We would also like you to make the most of this activity by selecting things you know you might find a little tricky – don’t just play the games you know you can do easily! Remember to choose at least one mode you didn’t have a go at last time.

Other curriculum task - Art

In previous art lessons, we’ve used videos to show us step by step ways of making simple but effective cartoons. Sometimes, though, you want to be able to make your drawings look even more realistic and three dimensional. We can usually achieve this through shading. There are lots of different shading techniques and it is useful to be able to use different ones.

Watch this video from Mary Doodles, which explains how to make a value scale (light to dark) using a range of different shading techniques, including: basic shading, hatching, cross-hatching, stippling and smudging!

You might want to pause the video between each explanation so that you can have a go at making your value scale with that technique, before you carry on with the next explanation.

Make sure you send us a picture of your different shading scales! Or, if you’re feeling really confident, see if you can use one of the techniques to add some texture to one of your own creations for the Get Creative theme day…

 

Thursday 4th June 2020

Let's wake up our brains with another spot the difference!

Again, there are 10 differences to find...

spot diff

Let’s begin with some more mental arithmetic this morning:

Mental calculation: number bonds to 1000

640 + ? = 1000                                  810 + ? = 1000                                  235 + ? = 1000

444 + ? = 1000                                  517 + ? = 1000                                  134 + ? = 1000

170.5 + ? = 1000                               550.5 + ? = 1000                               762.5 + ? = 1000

 

If you have been following our new book, here is the next chapter.

Cover

English Task

Today, we are going to start by looking again at the 'Kingfisher' poem.

Kingfisher

First, note down all of the different names given to the kingfisher in the poem (there are quite a few!).

Once you have done this, look at this document for today's task.

Maths task

In today’s task we will look at rounding to the nearest 10, 100 and 1,000 – something you have lots of previous experience with. Let’s start by clicking here for a quick reminder of the rules of rounding, but if you feel confident then head straight for the first task here.

Once you have completed the first task, have a go at these:

1)

Zachary is thinking of a whole number.  

When he rounds his number to the nearest 10 he gets 250.

When he rounds his number to the nearest 100 he gets 200.  

What could his number be? List all possible numbers.

2.

What is the largest whole number which rounded to the nearest 1000 gives 4000?

What is the smallest whole number which rounded to the nearest 1000 gives 4000?

Other curriculum task - RE

During the last couple of months, Muslims around the world have been participating in Ramadan, a time of fasting, reflection and generosity. The month of Ramadan ended on 23rd May with a big celebration called “Eid ul-Fitr”. In some ways, the season is very similar to the period of Lent and the celebration of Easter in the Christian calendar.

On this page, read the information about Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr and watch the first video in which eleven-year-old Sara tells us a bit more about what life is like for her and her family during the month of Ramadan.

Although Ramadan is now over, for some of us we might feel that this period of lockdown has been a bit similar: we have not been able to do all of the things we would normally do. This is a good time to stop and think about the things that make us happy and for which we can be grateful.

Take a moment to think back over the last month and write down as many things as you can think of that you are really thankful for. For example, you might write:

  • I am grateful that I can video call my family, even though I have not been able to see them in person because of lockdown.
  • I have enjoyed the good weather and being able to spend time outside.
  • I am thankful for having a bike that I can go for rides on.
  • Etc…

During Ramadan, Muslims also make special plans for what they will do once it finishes and they celebrate Eid. Similarly, it is important to be able to look forward to things, which you might not currently be able to do because of the current lockdown. Think about using this activity to make some special plans for after lockdown ends completely. If you don’t have a jar you can use, you could simply make a list – but keep it safe somewhere, so that you can look back at the list once life goes back to normal!

 

Wednesday 3rd June 2020

Welcome to Wednesday! How did you get on yesterday with the spot the difference!? Here is the solution!

spot diff answersarithmetic

English Task

Today, we are going to focus on the poem 'Fern' from 'The Lost Words'.

fern

You will notice that alliteration is used a lot throughout this poem; the same initial sounds are used for a lot of the description.

Look at this short clip which gives you more information about these ancient plants.

Look back at the poem:

  • Note down each verb which is used to describe the fern.
    • What do you notice about these?

Once you have done this, look at this document to see today's main task.

 

Maths task

Today, we are going to work on how to calculate the difference between positive and negative numbers and use a strategy to find the correct answers consistently.

Look at the brief explanation below and have a go at this example:

explanation

Click here to access the first independent task.

Now you have had a go at ‘finding the difference’ using a number line, see if you can complete this next task to apply your knowledge in a slightly different way.

 

Other curriculum task - Music

Today we are going to be using the 2Sequence program on Purple Mash again, but this time we want you to try and use some “found sounds”.

First, have a look at this website and watch the video about Jules Stevenson and how he composes music using sounds that he finds all around him.

Now, have an explore around you – in your house or outside – to see what interesting sounds you can find. See if you can get a mixture of sounds that have a different timbre – a different quality to the sound – so, for example, try and find some sounds that are high and some that are low; some that are short, sharp sounds; others that are longer sounds; some that are percussive, rhythmic beats; and maybe even some that make a short melody or tune!

Log in to Purple Mash on your device and find the 2Sequence program in your 2Dos. It should be possible, using the device that you are accessing Purple Mash on, to record the sounds you have found.

  1. Click on “My Sounds”, at the bottom of the page with the other sound categories.
My Sounds
  1. Click the “+” symbol to add a new sound.
Record
  1. Click “Record”, with the microphone symbol. You should then see a screen with a red circle, which you can click to record!

Once you have recorded the sound and are happy with it, click “Done” to save it to your bank of sounds. You are now ready to add it in to your sequences like we’ve done before! Don’t forget to think about having a regular beat to anchor your piece of music, with repeated rhythms and melody layered over the top! If you need a reminder of how to go about combining these things, check out Mr Kenchington's video here.

Happy composing!!

 

Tuesday 2nd June 2020

Good Morning! Hope you are all well and getting back into the swing of things! We didn't have work from many of you yesterday so do make sure you are continuing to send it in - we will get back to you as soon as we can!

Here is a spot the difference to get your brains going! There are 10 differences...

spot diff bee

 

English task

tues

Here is a document with the four poems.

task 2

 

Maths task

Today, we will continue the theme of place value by looking at how to position numbers on a number line using estimation and reasoning.

First, have a look at this number line and think about where you would place the number 700,000?

  • What did you do before making your choice?
  • With only two numbers on the line to begin with, did you try to add extra information to help you?
Number line

Click here to see if you were correct.

Now, have a look at this number line and see if you can estimate the number marked by the arrow.

Number line2

Click here to see if you were correct.

If the arrow was to move to a different position you would again need to estimate the number – with large numbers like these we tend to round to an appropriate figure.

In your task today you will need to estimate the position of different numbers on a number line and come with numbers for positions already marked for you. You might want to draw the number lines and boxes out if you aren’t able to print – do what works for you.

 Remember, estimations are not exact and should be informed by the information you have around you. Click here to have a go.

 

Extra curriculum task - Geography

Today we are going to be thinking about how the earth on which we live provides us with everything we need to survive and thrive.

Even though many of the things we use every day are man-made, and not natural in themselves (phones don’t grow on trees!), everything that they are made of comes originally from nature in some way. We call all of these materials and substances produced by the environment, “Natural Resources”.

Tree phone?

Click here to find today’s lesson on Natural Resources and watch a video explaining the difference between agricultural resources (those related to farming) and geological resources (those found underground).

After this, have a look at the second video, which is a short film about what life is like for a family living in China, whose relationship with the Natural Resources around them is much clearer than it might be for us.

Now think about your own life. What is different about the way you live, from the way He Ruiqin and her family in China live? How is it the same?

It might be obvious to think about the Natural Resources that she uses in her life as a farmer. But what about you? What Natural Resources do you use in your everyday life?

Make a table like this one to see if you can list as many Natural Resources that you use every day as you can.

 

1st June 2020

welcome back

We hope you had a lovely break over half term and managed to enjoy the sunshine!

Just a reminder that, if you are not returning to school, you still need to check this page every day and complete your home learning tasks. We still would love to hear from you and see what you have done - but we won't be able to reply as quickly as before as we are teaching in school. Remember, there is a new email address - year6@whiptonbarton.org - for you to send your work to.

First, lets have a go at some mental arithmetic:

Mental calculation: addition

430 + 79 =                                          816 + 295 =                                        3163 + 313 =

16.3 + 5.8 =                                       36.2 + 28.9 =                                     193.3 + 150.7 =

4.75 + 0.48 =                                     27.76 + 66.5 =                                  44.83 + 9.023 =

English Task

Have a look at these words:

words

First, make a note of any words you are unsure of.

Now, look at the words again.

  • How would you group them?
  • Can you find different ways to put these into groups? What are your reasons?
  • Write down your groups and reasons.

Does this give you any ideas about the words you did not know? Add this to your notes.

Now, look at this document. It shows the cover of a book that these words are taken from. There are also some questions to look at.

When you have completed the task about the book cover, look at the introduction to the book here. This gives you a little more background to the book.

intro task

 

Maths task

Today your task focuses on place value and recognising numbers up to 10,000,000 (ten million). First, have a look at this starter activity where there are two things you need to do:

  • look at the different numbers written as numerals (digits) and write them in word form
  • look at the different numbers written in word form and write them as numerals (digits)

Click here to have a go.

Now that you have completed the first activity, we would like you take it a step further and identify the value of specific digits within larger numbers:

e.g. 11,396 – the value of the highlighted digit would be 1,000 (one thousand)

Have a go at this activity and be sure to write the values you have identified with accuracy and in both numeral form and word form if you can. You might also want to have a go at the stretch task at the end of this activity.

Other Curriculum task - 30 Days Wild

Today marks the beginning of 30 Days Wild 2020. If we were all together in school, we would be trying to get out into our surrounding area to explore and make the most of the nature that surrounds us.

While we can’t all do that together, you can each try and get to know your own natural area a little better this month. We will be updating this page of the school website every day with a new Random Act of Wildness that you can have a go at. Make sure you send us some photos of what you get up to - we would really like to be able to use some of them to update the 30 Days Wild page!

For today, start by going on a walk for 15-20 minutes or so around your local area, or even in your own garden or courtyard if you have one, and see what you can tick off from this Wild Bingo card. If you don’t complete the card, keep it and remember to cross other things off as you go through this month.

You might even want to ask someone at home to help you set up an area for a “Nature Table”, where you can sort and display any interesting natural things that you find during your 30 Days Wild. This sheet gives you an example of the different categories you could split your findings into.

Most of all, have fun being wild and make the most of the good weather while it lasts!